Habitat

Join Eric Lee-Mäder, Pollinator Program Co-Director, as he takes a closer look at the needs of pollinators in the Pacific Northwest Region. Learn what plants pollinators need, how to provide nesting habitat, and what steps you can take to make change in your city. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.
Join Jessa Kay Cruz, Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist, as she takes a closer look at the needs of pollinators in the California Region. Learn what plants pollinators need, how to provide nesting habitat, and what steps you can take to make change in your city. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.
Join panelists from communities around the country to learn about the innovative approaches they have taken to reduce pesticide use and protect pollinators. Communities have tackled pesticides in a wide range of ways, from implementing integrated pest management plans on city land, to educating neighbors about how to take an ecological approach to mosquito control, to galvanizing community support for state legislative efforts. In this webinar, you will hear from three communities about their successes and challenges in addressing pesticide use. We hope this will inspire you to consider creative ways to reduce pesticide use in your own community and beyond. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.
Join Nancy Adamson of Xerces to learn about specialist bees and how you can help document plant-pollinator connections. Many bees are pollen specialists, collecting pollen from a single species, genus, or plant family. Despite knowing many of these plant-bee connections, we do not have good images of all these specialist bees. We would love your help documenting them and other invertebrates visiting their host plants. This program will highlight where to find specialist bee information--primarily for the eastern U.S.—and bee phenology information to guide your efforts. We will also discuss how you can help document wildlife via iNaturalist.org and Bugguide.net. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.
While pollinator conservation efforts among universities continue to grow, many others remain unengaged. Demonstrating the value of pollinator conservations among students may help encourage university leaders to take action. Join Dr. Jerrod Penn to learn about the research that he and Wuyang Hu did to investigate the role of student interest in pollinator conservation actions. This webinar will include an overview of their study and their finding that certification generally creates positive benefits greater than costs. Jerrod Penn, PhD – Jerrod is an assistant professor of environmental/resource economics and sustainability at Louisiana State University. His work focuses on individual behavior and preferences to understand economic values for changes in the environment such as species abundance and diversity. His collaborations include work on resource conservation for pollinators, sustainable forestry, outdoor recreation, beach management, and agriculture. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.
Learn more about choosing plants and ornamentals for your outdoor spaces to support the native bee population. Meet the UMD Bee Lab, learn what they do and how to buy UMD Honey. Featuring: Dennis van Engelsdorp, Associate Professor in Entomology and Mark Dykes, UMD Extension Bee Specialist. Zach Jones, Symons Squad member and '20 landscape management alum will also join us to talk about designing your outdoor spaces. He works for McHale Design as an Assistant Account Manager.
Usually when people hear the buzz phrase “pollinator conservation” they think of bees and butterflies, not people. However, people have an essential role to play in pollinator conservation. Join guest speaker, Shannon Westlake, to learn about the human side of pollinator conservation and the various actions you can take to get more involved with supporting our native insect pollinator friends. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.
Fireflies are surely among the greatest ambassadors for Earth’s natural magic. For centuries their ethereal beauty has sparked wonder and inspired poets, artists, and children of all ages. Yet they also hold so many mysteries! Join guest speaker Sara Lewis, an expert on fireflies, to learn how they got their bright lights, explore their remarkable lifestyles, hear how human activities put fireflies at risk, and learn what you can do to help protect these charismatic insects. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.
Celebrate Pollinator Week by joining in a fun and informative happy hour Q&A with a panel of Xerces Society pollinator conservation experts!  For nearly 50 years, Xerces staff have worked to protect and conserve pollinators and their habitats. Our amazing staff are national leaders getting science-based guidance for pollinator conservation into the hands of farmers, ranchers, gardeners, and other land managers. During this Q&A, participants will have the opportunity to directly ask Xerces staff about anything and everything related to pollinator conservation, native habitat restoration, pesticide use and impacts, climate change resilience, grazing management, and more. We’ll also be distributing door prizes such as Xerces Society books, habitat signs, and more to attendees throughout the hour! Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar.   This event will be emceed by Eric Lee-Mäder (Pollinator Program Co-Director) and the panelists are: Stephanie Frischie (Agronomist, Native Plant Materials Specialist), Kelly Gill (Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist, Northeast/Mid-Atlantic Region), Sarah Hoyle (Pesticide Program Specialist), Jennifer Hopwood (Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist, Midwest),  Karin Jokela (Farm Bill Pollinator Conservation Planner, Minnesota), Jessa Kay Cruz (Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist, California and the Intermountain West), Angela Laws (Endangered Species Conservation Biologist and Climate Change Lead), Molly Martin (Bee City USA Coordinator), and Ray Moranz (Grazing Lands Pollinator Ecologist).   This webinar will be available via zoom (click here to register) and through Facebook Live on the Xerces Society Facebook page at the time of the event.
Join Akito Y. Kawahara, the lead researcher at the Florida Museum of Natural History's McGuire Center for Lepidoptera and Biodiversity, to learn about how to help save our important insects. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.
Join Paola Olaya Arenas, a postdoctoral fellow at Institute Alexander von Humboldt, as she talks about her research on insect pests and natural enemies in Bogotá. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.
Biodiversity across the globe and throughout the tree of life is in major flux, and understanding the nature and causes of these changes is critical for developing effective conservation and management strategies. Pollinators are an especially important group to understand biodiversity change in, given the ecosystem and agricultural services that they provide, and bumblebees are a particularly important group of wild native pollinators found across North America and Europe. Over the last few decades, many species across this group have been declining, with links being made to climate change and habitat loss as the culprits. Join Peter Soroye, Conservation Biologist, to learn about his PhD research, looking at many species across multiple continents to explore how climate change has affected North America and European bumblebees over the last 120 years, and how human land use and habitat loss change that relationship. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.
Join Matt Forister, Professor of Biology and Insect Ecology at the University of Nevada, as he explores data from different long term sources on western butterfly species and habitats and an overview of threats in the west. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.
To protect pollinators, Bee Cities and Campuses are re-examining chemical-centric pest management practices and reducing pesticide use on city and campus lands. Join us for a presentation by Sharon Selvaggio, Pesticide Program Specialist at the Xerces Society, to learn about proven best practices for cities and campuses striving to reduce their reliance on pesticides. Sharon will also touch on examples of community-based efforts that are inspiring more people to reduce their reliance on these risky tools at home. This session is appropriate for all Bee City USA and Bee Campus USA affiliates, including grounds staff; city or campus managers; and community members.
The City of San Francisco has been a recognized leader in urban Integrated Pest Management for decades. Join Chris Geiger, PhD, of San Francisco (Manager of the Green Purchasing & IPM Programs) to learn what has made San Francisco’s IPM program one of the most recognized in the country. And from Portland Community College, meet Jack Lussier (District Grounds Manager), who oversees its effective campus IPM program. Attend this session to learn about sound, forward-thinking integrated pest management programs that can serve as models for your affiliate’s program. This session is suitable for all Bee City USA and Bee Campus USA affiliates, including grounds staff; city or campus managers; and community members.
Bumble bees are among the best-studied invertebrates, yet a number of aspects of these important pollinators' life history remain uncertain. One of these is the ecology of nest founding by queens in spring, and more broadly, behaviors in the nest. More than one-quarter of North American bumble bee species are currently at some degree of extinction risk, so we urgently need more information on how nesting biology impacts colony development and reproduction, and how a changing environment affects bumble bee nesting behavior. In this webinar, we'll examine what is known of bumble bee nesting biology, and consider some unanswered questions about how cooperation and conflict structure the social lives and growth of bumble bee colonies. Along the way, we'll answer questions about what queens are up to in early spring and how people can support bumble bees populations. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here to register and for more information.
Join Emma Pelton, Senior Conservation Biologist, and Angela Laws, Endangered Species Conservation Biologist with Xerces, to learn more about the exciting work Xerces is doing to protect western monarchs in California. We will talk about the status of western monarchs, including information from the recent overwintering counts, and then discuss the work Xerces is doing with partners around the state to create and protect monarch habitat in their overwintering and breeding grounds. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.
Addressing climate change and protecting biodiversity go hand-in-hand. In this webinar Angela Laws, Endangered Species Conservation Biologist and Climate Change Lead for Xerces will talk about the many linkages between climate change and biodiversity. We will learn about some of the many ways that pollinators may be affected by climate change. We’ll discuss Xerces’ approach to protecting biodiversity while addressing climate change using nature-based climate solutions, as well as actions that everyone can take to help. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.
By May, spring will have arrived across the US and with it, many bees will be emerging and seeking out places to forage and nest -- and you might be surprised at how many different species can be found in gardens, parks, and other green spaces across our neighborhoods and hometowns. Matthew Shepherd, Director of Outreach & Education, will introduce you to commonly encountered bees, with notes on their diversity and behaviors, how to identify them, and their habitat needs. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.
This webinar series take you through a variety of pollinators and how to attract and grow for them. Join us on our pollinator journey! January 20, 2022: A Year in the Life, Honey Bee and Beekeeper with Al Banwell February 17, 2022: Beginner's Guide to Mason and Leafcutter Bees with Marty Wood March 17, 2022: Growing Butterflies with George Curran April 21, 2022: Phoebus Waterfront Park Pollinator Garden with April Receveur May 19, 2022: Container Gardening with Gayle Mooney June 16, 2022: Pollinators and Beneficial Insects in the Garden with Dr. Barb Abraham July 21, 2022: There’s More Than One Tree to Help Our Pollinators! with Debbie Blanton
This webinar series take you through a variety of pollinators and how to attract and grow for them. Join us on our pollinator journey! January 20, 2022: A Year in the Life, Honey Bee and Beekeeper with Al Banwell February 17, 2022: Beginner's Guide to Mason and Leafcutter Bees with Marty Wood March 17, 2022: Growing Butterflies with George Curran April 21, 2022: Phoebus Waterfront Park Pollinator Garden with April Receveur May 19, 2022: Container Gardening with Gayle Mooney June 16, 2022: Pollinators and Beneficial Insects in the Garden with Dr. Barb Abraham July 21, 2022: There’s More Than One Tree to Help Our Pollinators! with Debbie Blanton
This webinar series take you through a variety of pollinators and how to attract and grow for them. Join us on our pollinator journey! January 20, 2022: A Year in the Life, Honey Bee and Beekeeper with Al Banwell February 17, 2022: Beginner's Guide to Mason and Leafcutter Bees with Marty Wood March 17, 2022: Growing Butterflies with George Curran April 21, 2022: Phoebus Waterfront Park Pollinator Garden with April Receveur May 19, 2022: Container Gardening with Gayle Mooney June 16, 2022: Pollinators and Beneficial Insects in the Garden with Dr. Barb Abraham July 21, 2022: There’s More Than One Tree to Help Our Pollinators! with Debbie Blanton
This webinar series take you through a variety of pollinators and how to attract and grow for them. Join us on our pollinator journey! January 20, 2022: A Year in the Life, Honey Bee and Beekeeper with Al Banwell February 17, 2022: Beginner's Guide to Mason and Leafcutter Bees with Marty Wood March 17, 2022: Growing Butterflies with George Curran April 21, 2022: Phoebus Waterfront Park Pollinator Garden with April Receveur May 19, 2022: Container Gardening with Gayle Mooney June 16, 2022: Pollinators and Beneficial Insects in the Garden with Dr. Barb Abraham July 21, 2022: There’s More Than One Tree to Help Our Pollinators! with Debbie Blanton
This webinar series take you through a variety of pollinators and how to attract and grow for them. Join us on our pollinator journey! January 20, 2022: A Year in the Life, Honey Bee and Beekeeper with Al Banwell February 17, 2022: Beginner's Guide to Mason and Leafcutter Bees with Marty Wood March 17, 2022: Growing Butterflies with George Curran April 21, 2022: Phoebus Waterfront Park Pollinator Garden with April Receveur May 19, 2022: Container Gardening with Gayle Mooney June 16, 2022: Pollinators and Beneficial Insects in the Garden with Dr. Barb Abraham July 21, 2022: There’s More Than One Tree to Help Our Pollinators! with Debbie Blanton
This webinar series take you through a variety of pollinators and how to attract and grow for them. Join us on our pollinator journey! January 20, 2022: A Year in the Life, Honey Bee and Beekeeper with Al Banwell February 17, 2022: Beginner's Guide to Mason and Leafcutter Bees with Marty Wood March 17, 2022: Growing Butterflies with George Curran April 21, 2022: Phoebus Waterfront Park Pollinator Garden with April Receveur May 19, 2022: Container Gardening with Gayle Mooney June 16, 2022: Pollinators and Beneficial Insects in the Garden with Dr. Barb Abraham July 21, 2022: There’s More Than One Tree to Help Our Pollinators! with Debbie Blanton
This webinar series take you through a variety of pollinators and how to attract and grow for them. Join us on our pollinator journey! January 20, 2022: A Year in the Life, Honey Bee and Beekeeper with Al Banwell February 17, 2022: Beginner's Guide to Mason and Leafcutter Bees with Marty Wood March 17, 2022: Growing Butterflies with George Curran April 21, 2022: Phoebus Waterfront Park Pollinator Garden with April Receveur May 19, 2022: Container Gardening with Gayle Mooney June 16, 2022: Pollinators and Beneficial Insects in the Garden with Dr. Barb Abraham July 21, 2022: There’s More Than One Tree to Help Our Pollinators! with Debbie Blanton
This webinar series take you through a variety of pollinators and how to attract and grow for them. Join us on our pollinator journey! January 20, 2022: A Year in the Life, Honey Bee and Beekeeper with Al Banwell February 17, 2022: Beginner's Guide to Mason and Leafcutter Bees with Marty Wood March 17, 2022: Growing Butterflies with George Curran April 21, 2022: Phoebus Waterfront Park Pollinator Garden with April Receveur May 19, 2022: Container Gardening with Gayle Mooney June 16, 2022: Pollinators and Beneficial Insects in the Garden with Dr. Barb Abraham July 21, 2022: There’s More Than One Tree to Help Our Pollinators! with Debbie Blanton
Join the Pollinator Friendly Alliance and Xerces Society for this three-day online event with a wealth of presenters and topics. Participants will learn ecologically sound land stewardship practices that promote pollinators, climate resilience, clean water and lands. Summit topics provide practical knowledge and innovation on pesticide reduction, habitat installation, soil health and more. Click here for more information and to register.
Join the Pollinator Friendly Alliance and Xerces Society for this three-day online event with a wealth of presenters and topics. Participants will learn ecologically sound land stewardship practices that promote pollinators, climate resilience, clean water and lands. Summit topics provide practical knowledge and innovation on pesticide reduction, habitat installation, soil health and more. Click here for more information and to register.
Join the Pollinator Friendly Alliance and Xerces Society for this three-day online event with a wealth of presenters and topics. Participants will learn ecologically sound land stewardship practices that promote pollinators, climate resilience, clean water and lands. Summit topics provide practical knowledge and innovation on pesticide reduction, habitat installation, soil health and more. Click here for more information and to register.
Join Maddy Kangas, Monarch Butterfly Conservation Planner with the Xerces Society, for this webinar hosted by the Santa Cruz Museum of Natural History. Maddy will discuss the status of pollinators, including monarch butterflies, and need for conservation action; monarch biology and habitat requirements; land management practices to protect pollinators; examples of pollinator habitat projects; and how you can get involved (community science programs and more).
Join Bee City USA and HHMI Tangled Bank Studios to learn how Bee City USA and Bee Campus USA affiliates can host a free film screening of My Garden of a Thousand Bees in their communities. Includes a free promotional toolkit. This webinar will be recorded and available to affiliates. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Speakers: Alex Pearson, Impact & Communications Producer, HHMI Tangled Bank Studios Matthew Shepherd, Director of Outreach & Education, The Xerces Society Laura Rost, Bee City USA and Bee Campus USA Coordinator, The Xerces Society About the film: My Garden of a Thousand Bees follows acclaimed wildlife filmmaker Martin Dohrn during the COVID-19 lockdown of spring and summer 2020, as he becomes bee obsessed and develops relationships with individual bees. Filming more than 60 species of bees, from Britain’s largest bumblebees to scissor bees, which are the size of a mosquito, Dohrn observes how differences in behavior set different species apart from each other. Eventually, he gets so close to the bees, he can identify individuals just by looking at them.
Are your pollinator-friendly plants pesticide-free?  Studies are showing that too many landscape plants and trees are pre-treated well before sale with long lasting pesticides, including both insecticides and fungicides.  We don't want to betray the pollinators we are working to save by luring them to flowers that potentially can cause them harm. Learn how to ask the right questions to get the correct answers from your nursery, tree broker or landscape professional. Join us for a conversation about pre-treated plants and trees with Dr. Susan Kegley, Pesticide Toxicologist and organic farmer, Aimee Code and Sharon Selvaggio of Xerces Society, and Podcaster Terry Oxford along with Kreigh and Ashley of Burbank’s Monarch Mile. Register in advance for this webinar here.
Recent research on western butterflies has highlighted the influences of climate change, pesticides, and other stressors in the decline of many butterfly species across our western landscapes. These declines are not limited to species with small ranges, but also include widespread species like the west coast lady (Vanessa annabella), ruddy copper (Tharsalea rubidus), and others. Join Kevin Burls, Xerces Endangered Species Conservation Advocate, as he highlights some of the butterfly species most at risk of decline in Utah, Arizona, New Mexico, and Colorado, based on a recent west-wide assessment by Xerces staff and collaborating scientists, and will discuss the best ways to conserve existing populations of these imperiled pollinators. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here to register for free.   Kevin Burls Endangered Species Conservation Advocate As Conservation Advocate for the Endangered Species program, Kevin’s efforts with the Xerces Society focus on protecting the hundreds of butterfly species that inhabit deserts, forests, and grasslands across the western United States. Before working with the Xerces Society, Kevin was the Integrated Pest Management Educator for the University of Nevada, Reno Extension, with a focus on native pollinators and beneficial insects. In addition, Kevin and his wife co-founded the invertebrate science education nonprofit Nevada Bugs & Butterflies in Reno, Nevada in 2012. He holds a Ph.D. in Ecology, Evolution, and Conservation Biology from the University of Nevada, Reno.
Join Aaron Anderson and Sharon Selvaggio to learn about the unique and specialized relationships between pollinators, plants, and other species and how your planting choices can support biodiversity and conservation needs. We'll also cover the principles of ecologically-based pest management to reduce pesticide impacts to pollinators in the urban landscape. ReScape is sponsoring this talk as part of their Earth Day 2022 Partnership Program. ReScape provides a regenerative, whole systems foundation to landscaping education, workforce development and policy, addressing climate change earthscape and land use issues. Click here to register through ReScape.
Join Jennifer Hopwood, Xerces Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist, as she walks through how to turn your yard into a pollinator haven. Learn about Xerces resources such as plant lists, habitat assessment guides, and landscaping tools. Bring your questions and curiosity. This is the first webinar in our four-part Bring Back the Pollinators series. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register for free.   Jennifer Hopwood Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist -The Xerces Society Jennifer provides resources and training for pollinator and beneficial insect habitat management and restoration in a variety of landscapes. She oversees a team of four USDA Natural Resource Conservation Service partner biologists and works closely with the NRCS. Jennifer has authored a number of publications and articles, and is co-author of several books, including Farming with Native Beneficial Insects, 100 Plants to Feed the Bees, and a roadside revegetation manual. Jennifer has a master's degree in entomology from the University of Kansas. Along with work as a research specialist conducting invertebrate field research and identification, Jennifer was an instructor in biology and environmental science at Iowa State University and Des Moines Area Community College prior to joining Xerces in 2009.
How can we manage pests while protecting pollinators in home yards? Good garden pollinator habitat requires flowering plants and undisturbed places for pollinators to nest, but home landscapes also need to be protected from pesticides. Join Aaron Anderson, Xerces Pesticide Program Specialist, to touch on a few key pesticide concerns, and talk about alternative methods to reduce pest pressure. In particular, we will learn about some of the common beneficial insects that pollinator plantings can support and how they contribute to pest control. This is the second webinar in the four-part series Bring Back the Pollinators. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register for free.   Aaron Anderson Pesticide Program Specialist - The Xerces Society Aaron Anderson works with the public and Xerces staff to reduce pesticide use in residential landscapes, including promoting alternative pest control measures and pollinator-friendly gardening practices. Prior to joining Xerces in 2022, he researched pollinator conservation in urban landscapes, restored habitat for several endangered butterfly species, and worked in insect biocontrol. In 2021 he was an AAAS Mass Media Fellow at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, where he reported science and business stories. Aaron has a PhD from Oregon State University, and outside of work you can probably find him riding his bike, science writing, or fiddling with old cameras.
Join the Xerces Community Engagement team for an exploration of various ways to spread the word about pollinator conservation and how to get your community more involved. See examples of what others have done and learn about Bee City USA, the Pollinator Protection Pledge, and X Kids, a new Xerces program. This is the third webinar in the four-part series in Bring Back the Pollinators. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.   Matthew Shepherd Director of Outreach and Education - The Xerces Society Matthew has worked for the Xerces Society for more than two decades, initially at the vanguard of a new movement to protect pollinators, but then on endangered species and a range of other projects. He is the long-time editor of Wings magazine, and he spent several years leading Xerces' communications effort. His current work is focused on outreach, community engagement, and conservation in towns and cities. Matthew is author of numerous articles and other publications, including Attracting Native Pollinators (Storey Publishing, 2011) and Gardening for Butterflies (Timber Press, 2016).   Laura Rost Bee City USA Coordinator - The Xerces Society Laura has worked in development and communications for environmental groups since 2005, and has been with the Xerces Society since 2014. She loves to connect with members and share Xerces resources with the public. She holds a bachelor's degree in environmental studies and a certificate in nonprofit management from Southern Oregon University. While at SOU, Laura led the successful student referendum to offset 100% of natural gas and electricity consumed at university facilities through the purchase of renewable energy credits (RECs), making SOU the first public university in the nation to do so. At her home in Milwaukie, Oregon, Laura is converting her yard into pollinator habitat and an urban farm. She volunteers for her local school district’s clothes closet and food bank, and serves on the board of the Milwaukie Pioneer Cemetery.   Rachel Dunham Community Engagement Coordinator - The Xerces Society Engagement Coordinator, Rachel has built our volunteer program from the ground up and is finding new ways for Xerces to connect to communities. As an Oregonian, she has always loved wildlife and being outdoors. Rachel pursued her passion for nature at Seattle Pacific University, graduating with a bachelor's in ecology, and earning a master's of wildlife conservation from the University of Maine. She spent years traveling between Alaska and Hawaii, working as a naturalist for the National Park Service, U.S. Forest Service, and Princess Cruise Lines. Rachel also worked as a research associate in Panama and northern British Columbia. Before Xerces, Rachel worked at the Tualatin River National Wildlife Refuge, managing their public programs. Rachel lives in Missoula, Montana with her husband Chad and their dog Bear. They spend their time hiking, camping, and traveling the world.
Los Alamos Education Center
Los Alamos, New Mexico
The city of Los Alamos in New Mexico is developing an integrated pest management plan. What does this mean? Why is this important? Join Emily Ruth Spindler, Xerces Southwest Pesticide Program Specialist, to learn the basics about pesticides, unpack the implications of pesticide use on pollinators and the environment, and discover alternative pest management strategies for southwestern cities like Los Alamos. This webinar will be recorded and available on Xerces' YouTube channel after the event. Click here to learn more and register for free.
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT / 11:00 AM - 12:00 PM MT / 12:00 PM - 1:00 PM CT / 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM ET
The availability of nesting habitat is a critical yet often overlooked factor impacting native bee populations. In this webinar, Xerces Biologists, Leif Richardson and Sarah Foltz Jordan, will summarize nesting biology of major groups of bees, including leaf-cutter bees, mining bees, bumble bees, and many more. They will also offer numerous practical approaches to creating and managing nesting habitat features. Approaches are relevant to landscapers, farmers, gardeners, natural resource professionals, and anyone interested in taking the next step in supporting pollinators. Community science opportunities will also be discussed. This is the fourth webinar in the four-part series Bring Back the Pollinators. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register for free. Sarah Foltz Jordan Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist Habitat Restoration Specialist, Great Lakes Region - The Xerces Society Based out of central Minnesota, Sarah leads Xerces' upper Midwest native bee and monarch habitat restoration projects, working closely with farmers, agencies, and conservation groups to promote pollinators on farms and in natural areas. Sarah provides habitat restoration support to hundreds of farmers and farm agency professionals across the upper Midwest, with an emphasis on the testing of new, cutting-edge restoration methods on a wide range of fruit, vegetable, and grain farms. Currently she is a member of the Minnesota Governor’s Pollinator Protection Committee, and a consultant on habitat management for at-risk pollinators on public lands in Minnesota. She has authored comprehensive documents about the biology and conservation needs of nearly 200 rare invertebrates, along with numerous pollinator-related fact sheets, guidebooks, and educational tools. Sarah is also an organic apple farmer and is active in the sustainable agriculture community. She holds a master's degree.   Leif Richardson Conservation Biologist California Bumble Bee Atlas - The Xerces Society Leif is a conservation biologist who coordinates the California Bumble Bee Atlas project. His research focuses on the ecology, distribution, and declines of North American bumble bees. Leif previously worked as an environmental consultant, studying pesticide risk to bee pollinators, and as an ecologist for Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department. He is co-author of a range of scientific publications on bees, including Bumble Bees of North America: An Identification Guide (2014, Princeton University Press), the standard reference manual on this group of insects. He is an expert in the inventory and identification of bumble bees, and has extensive experience training others to collect bumble bee distribution data in the field. Leif holds a Master’s degree from the University of Arizona and a PhD from Dartmouth College.
Keep Tyler Beautiful will be celebrating the 2nd Annual Bee Day in the Garden on Thursday, June 23 from 4 - 6 p.m. CST at the Tyler Rose Garden, located at 420 Rose Park Drive. This event is a culmination of a week's long celebration of National Pollinator Week and celebrates our favorite pollinator, the honey bee. We invite the community to come and learn about bees and other pollinators and their importance. The celebration includes activities for children, honey vendors, face painters, and local food trucks. Educational workshops will be offered for residents interested in becoming beekeepers or planting a pollinator garden. The workshops will be led by the East Texas Beekeepers Association and the Smith County Master Gardeners. The City of Tyler is one of nine cities in Texas to be designated a Bee City USA, under the Keep Tyler Beautiful program. Our mission as an affiliate is to educate and raise awareness in the community on the importance of all pollinator species, including honey bees. All Bee Day in the Garden activities and educational workshops are free of cost. Vendors and food trucks will be fee. For more information on the Bee City USA and Keep Tyler Beautiful program please contact Erin Garner, Community Coordinator at KTyB@tylertexas.com or (903) 531-1335 or visit https://bit.ly/BeeDayintheGarden
Join us to plant some powerhouse pollinator plants at the pollinator hillside at Rainier Beach Urban Farm and Wetlands in SE Seattle in honor of Pollinator Week. Explore the farm! Bring a picnic lunch and enjoy on site after the work party.
Free webinar: Have you been hearing a lot about pollinators lately? From monarchs to honey bees, these guys have been getting a lot of attention in the news. Come find out what all the “buzz” is about. In this class you will learn about the importance of pollinators, theories on why they’re in decline, and how you can promote pollinators in your yard.
Reducing pesticide impacts and use is a key component of being a Bee City or Campus, but how this is achieved varies from one region to another as well as the specific location (is it a garden or a park, a formal planting or a natural area?). Join Sharon Selvaggio and Aaron Anderson of the Xerces Society's Pesticide Team for an "ask me anything"-style open house!  We'll do a short presentation on practical ways to reduce pesticide usage, followed by an extended Q&A session on anything Bee City/Campus or pesticide-related. This session is great for new or longtime participants. Bring your questions and please feel free to share your favorite pesticide reduction strategies with the group! This webinar will be recorded and available upon request: laura.rost@xerces.org.   Speakers: Sharon Selvaggio Pesticide Program Specialist, Parks, Nurseries & Natural Areas Lead - The Xerces Society Aaron Anderson Pesticide Program Specialist - The Xerces Society Laura Rost Bee City USA and Bee Campus USA Coordinator - The Xerces Society
Join Xerces Society Executive Director, Scott Black, as we kick off our next webinar series: Threats and Solutions. With well over one million known species, insects and other invertebrates eclipse all other forms of life on Earth. They are essential to the reproduction of most flowering plants, including many fruits, vegetables, and nuts; they are food for birds, fish, and other animals; they filter water and help clean rivers and streams; and they clean up waste from plants and animals. Just four of the many insect services—dung burial, pest control, pollination, and wildlife nutrition—have an estimated annual value in the United States alone of at least $70 billion. Though they are indisputably important, insects and other invertebrates are experiencing a multicontinental crisis evident as reductions in abundance, diversity and biomass. Given the centrality of insects to terrestrial and freshwater aquatic ecosystems and the food chain that supports humans, the potential importance of this crisis cannot be overstated. The loss of insect diversity is driven by habitat loss and degradation, pesticide use, climate change, diseases and more. The science is clear: It is impossible to address the loss of biodiversity without addressing climate change, but equally impossible to tackle the full impacts of climate change without working to protect and enhance biodiversity. Scott will discuss how nature-based solutions can address both. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.   Scott Black Executive Director - The Xerces Society Scott Black is an internationally renowned conservationist who has been at the forefront of the conservation movement for three decades. Scott’s work has led to protection and restoration of habitat on millions of acres of rangelands, forests, and farmland as well as protection for many endangered species.
To help ensure healthy ecosystems and successful harvests, pollinator conservation is essential. For many people, pollinator conservation is synonymous with the honey bee and beekeeping, but the story is bigger than that; much, much bigger than that. As we work to conserve pollinators, we need to ensure that our efforts are best directed where they are needed most, and not just at what is easiest to accomplish. While honey bees are important for our current agricultural systems, their role in our natural areas, and even in our urban and suburban areas, is more complicated. Join Xerces Society Senior Conservation Biologist Rich Hatfield for an honest conversation about the unseen consequences that a focus on honey bees can have, and how we can focus our actions in ways that will create positive change, for all pollinators. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.   Rich Hatfield Senior Endangered Species Conservation Biologist Bumble Bee Conservation Lead - The Xerces Society Rich manages all aspects of the Xerces Society’s work on bumble bees. In addition to his skills as a research biologist, Rich also has extensive classroom teaching experience with a focus on conservation biology, ecology, and sustainability.
Come join Kass Urban-Mead, Xerces Pollinator Conservation Specialist, NRCS Partner Biologist, for an adventure exploring how wild bees use the woods--from the leafy forest floor to the tippy top of the canopy. Although we usually think of bees busy in our gardens, flower patches, and meadows (which is true!), that is not the only place they are found. In fact, in the northeastern US up to 1/3 of our wild bee species may rely on forest habitats for at least a part of their life cycle. Some are specialized to only collect pollen from spring ephemerals on the forest floor, while others nest in stumps, logs, and leaf litter deep in the woods, and orchard pollinators use forest canopy pollen before the orchards bloom. We will discuss the changing nature of forests on our landscape and how this is likely to affect different groups of bees. Finally, we will highlight ways in which forest management for healthy, diverse, climate-resilient woods is crucial not just for birds and other wildlife, but also for the bees. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register. Kass Urban-Mead Pollinator Conservation Specialist, NRCS Partner Biologist - The Xerces Society Kass Urban-Mead provides technical assistance on pollinator conservation in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast region. As part of this work, she assists with planning, designing, installing, and managing habitat for pollinators and other beneficial insects. Kass also works with staff and research partners to develop technical guidelines and provide training on pollinator conservation practices.
Education and outreach to the broader community is a key component of Bee City USA and Bee Campus USA. In this webinar, staff from the Xerces Society's pesticide reduction team will demonstrate a free, template presentation "How to Reduce Pesticides at Home," that affiliate cities and campuses can download and present at local events. The pesticide reduction staff will answer questions and offer tips on how to conduct more effective pesticide reduction outreach. This free event will be recorded and available to affiliates.    
A private parking lot in Wilsonville, Oregon became the unexpected site of the country's largest bumble bee kill, when an estimated 50,000-100,000 bumble bees died during Pollinator Week in 2013, after neonicotinoid insecticide was applied to linden trees located in the lot. Since then, the City of Wilsonville has rallied to support bee conservation through joining Bee City USA and establishing its Bee Stewards Wilsonville program. Join Kerry Rappold, Natural Resources Program Manager for the City of Wilsonville, who will discuss the city's work since the bee kill, including pollinator habitat establishment, integrated pest management in parks and public spaces, residential education, and involvement in state policy work. This event will include auto-generated closed captioning and will be recorded and available to Bee City USA and Bee Campus USA affiliates.   Man in black polo shirt smiling, next to tree Kerry Rappold Natural Resources Manager - City of Wilsonville During his 21 years with the City of Wilsonville, Kerry Rappold has had responsibility for program development; compliance with local, state and federal requirements; capital project planning and implementation; stormwater management and permitting; managing enhancement and restoration projects; pollinator conservation; and environmental education. Kerry’s previous work experience has included silviculture and urban forestry, watershed management and monitoring, and regulatory review and permitting.
Optional workshop: "Implementing a community-wide pollinator protection program" at the Protecting Pollinators in Urban Landscapes 2022 conference (October 10-12) held at the University of Georgia in Athens, GA. Workshop led by Laura Rost, The Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation; Peter Helfrich, Decatur, GA Bee City; and Tyra Byers, University of Georgia Bee Campus.  
A recently published study reported that milkweeds purchased from retail nurseries across 15 states contained an average of 12 pesticides per plant. Join the lead researchers from the University of Nevada-Reno and Xerces Society to learn more about the findings and to learn what consumers and retailers can do to help turn the tide toward greater availability of pollinator-safe plants from U.S. nurseries. A thirty minute presentation will be followed by 30 minutes for Q and A. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register for free. Chris Halsch PhD candidate - University of Nevada Reno Chris is a PhD candidate at the University of Nevada Reno where he studies the impacts of global change on butterfly populations, especially climate change and pesticides. This can take the form of running through the mountains with a net or slumped over a laptop in a coffee shop. When not in the mountains for work he goes to the mountains for pleasure! Sharon Selvaggio Pesticide Program Specialist Parks, Nurseries & Natural Areas Lead - The Xerces Society Sharon assists Xerces staff, partners, and the public to reduce reliance on pesticides and understand pesticide risk to invertebrates. Sharon previously worked at Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Forest Service, and integrates her focus on pesticides with her experience managing natural areas and agricultural lands. Sharon earned a master's of science in energy and resources and a bachelor of arts in biology, both from the University of California, Berkeley. Sharon spends a lot of time in her vegetable garden, which has an always-buzzing insectary/pollinator patch, and she is a frequent visitor to the Pacific northwest's wildlands for recreation.
Hosted by the Association for the Advancement of Sustainability in Higher Education (AASHE). Presentation by Laura Rost, coordinator of Bee Campus USA, an initiative of the Xerces Society, and Sheina Crystal, Director of Communications and Campaigns at Rewild Your Campus (formerly Herbicide Free Campus). Interested in sustainability certifications for your campus landscape? We’re here to help! Join Bee Campus USA, an initiative of the Xerces Society, and Rewild Your Campus to learn more about the two organizations’ certification programs. We have tools, resources and advice on how to reduce pesticide use and increase pollinator habitat to improve the health and safety of your campus for bees, beneficial insects and people. These certifications cover pesticide reduction, soil health, native plants, classroom education, coalition building and how to build a healthier campus! Hear the benefits and requirements of these different programs and see examples of real-world sustainability successes from a variety of participating colleges and universities.
Urban landscapes are diverse and can provide unique habitat opportunities for pollinators and other beneficial invertebrates. However, habitat loss in urban areas is a driving factor of insect decline. Small urban farms and community gardens are great locations to add in native habitat pockets, strips, hedgerows, gardens, and more. At the same time, these habitats can be designed to offer many added benefits for wildlife, crop production, water quality, stormwater management, education, and the community! Growing food in urban spaces is not a new practice, but its presence is increasing in many cities as more people are taking an active role in where their food comes from and the betterment of their communities and environment. Join Xerces Society staff Mace Vaughan, Pollinator Conservation Program Co-Director, and Stefanie Steele, Pollinator Conservation Specialist, as they dive deeper into the issue of pollinator habitat loss in urban landscapes and how we can tackle this while also addressing other conservation and climate change challenges. They will also provide resources and techniques you can use on your small urban farm or community garden to increase native biodiversity and attract pollinating insects, beneficial predatory insects, and more! This webinar is hosted by Xerces Society and will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.   Stefanie Steele Pollinator Conservation Specialist for Urban and Small Farms in Underserved Communities and NRCS Partner Biologist - The Xerces Society Stefanie is the Pollinator Conservation Specialist for Urban and Small Farms in Underserved Communities and a NRCS Partner Biologist in the Upper Midwest – Detroit, Michigan area. Through this work, she provides technical assistance, planning, and education on incorporating pollinator and other beneficial invertebrate habitat in small urban agricultural areas and community gardens in historically excluded communities. Her work supports projects including the Xerces Habitat Kit Program, People’s Garden Initiative, and NRCS Conservation Programs through the USDA Farm Bill. Mace Vaughan Pollinator and Agricultural Biodiversity Co-Director - The Xerces Society Mace Vaughan serves as the Xerces Society’s Pollinator and Ag Biodiversity Conservation Program Co-Director, and as a Conservation Entomologist and Partner Biologist to the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service’s (NRCS) West National Technology Support Center in Portland, Oregon. Mace has led Xerces’ Pollinator Conservation Program since 2003 and has acted as a Partner Biologist to the NRCS since 2008. In his tenure at the Xerces Society, the pollinator program has grown from a small pilot project on California farms to a national program implementing pollinator conservation projects across the U.S. Mace co-leads a team of 25 pollinator conservation specialists and several consultants across the U.S., and now helps to supervise the world’s largest pollinator conservation team.
Mosquitos are a nuisance at best and health risk at worst, so it's understandable why many people turn to insecticides to try and control these pests. Though spraying may seem like a quick and easy way to deal with mosquitos, it's often an ineffective control strategy. Worse, these insecticides are toxic to pollinators and other beneficial insects. Join Aaron Anderson, Xerces Pesticide Program Specialist, to touch on the risks that mosquito spraying poses and discuss practical, alternative methods of mosquito control in residential landscapes. This free Xerces Society webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register. Aaron Anderson Pesticide Program Specialist - The Xerces Society Aaron Anderson works with the public and Xerces staff to reduce pesticide use in residential landscapes, including promoting alternative pest control measures and pollinator-friendly gardening practices. Prior to joining Xerces in 2022, he researched pollinator conservation in urban landscapes, restored habitat for several endangered butterfly species, and worked in insect biocontrol. In 2021 he was an AAAS Mass Media Fellow at the St. Louis Post-Dispatch, where he reported science and business stories. Aaron has a PhD from Oregon State University, and outside of work you can probably find him riding his bike, science writing, or fiddling with old cameras.
Herbicides, "the chemical hoe," make up more than half of global pesticide sales and use, and are widely applied in agriculture, residential landscapes, and natural areas. Along with reducing the availability of food and shelter for pollinators, herbicides may have some direct effects on insects exposed in air, soil, water, and plants. Join Emily May, Pollinator Conservation Specialist with the Pesticide Program at Xerces, to get up to speed on what's currently known about the direct and indirect effects of herbicides on pollinators. This free Xerces Society webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register. Emily May Pollinator Conservation Specialist Agricultural Lead - The Xerces Society Emily May is a Pollinator Conservation Specialist with the Xerces Society's Pesticide Program. She received a master's of science in entomology from Michigan State University, and has studied pollinator habitat restoration, bee nesting habits, and the effects of pest management practices on wild bee communities. Her work with Xerces since 2015 has focused on supporting crop pollinators through habitat creation and protecting bees and other beneficial insects from pesticides.
Insect populations around the world are declining rapidly. But why? While habitat loss, pesticide use, and climate change all have something to do with it, I show in this talk that light pollution is another important — but too often overlooked — bringer of the insect apocalypse. Light pollution interferes with the development, movement, foraging, and reproduction of diverse insect species, including many that we know and love such as fireflies. Fortunately, there are many simple things that we can all do to help reverse this driver of insect declines. Light pollution can be cheaply, easily, and instantly eliminated, and doing so can help ensure that we live in harmony with our insect friends and neighbors for generations to come. This free Xerces Society webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register. Dr. Avalon C.S. Owens - The Rowland Institute at Harvard Dr. Avalon C.S. Owens (owenslab.org) received her Ph.D. in Biology from Tufts University in spring 2022, where she studied the impact of artificial light on bioluminescent fireflies. She also holds a B.A. in Integrative Biology from Harvard University and an M.S. in Entomology from National Taiwan University.
No Mow May has garnered a lot of media attention in the past few years. It’s catchy and succinct, but is it the best fit for your community this spring -- and will pausing mowing for a few weeks really save the bees? Join Xerces Society Outreach and Education Director Matthew Shepherd and Bee City USA Coordinator Laura Rost for a presentation on low mow and no mow options, and how No Mow May can be an opening to talk to the public about what really needs doing to protect pollinators during this important time of the year. We’ll allow plenty of time for discussion, so feel free to share your research and strategies. This free Bee City USA webinar is hosted by Xerces Society and will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel on the Bee City USA playlist. Auto-generated Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here for more information and to register.   Matthew Shepherd, Outreach and Education Director  Matthew has spent more than 35 years working with people from all walks of life to create better places for wildlife. His career began in England and took him to Kenya before his arrival in the United States. He has worked for the Xerces Society for two decades, initially at the vanguard of the movement to protect pollinators, but he shifted to communications, and now community engagement and conservation in towns and cities. Matthew is author of numerous articles and other publications, including Attracting Native Pollinators (Storey Publishing, 2011) and Gardening for Butterflies (Timber Press, 2016).   Laura Rost, Bee City USA Coordinator  Laura smiling and holding an aerial net Laura supports communities working to reduce pesticide use and protect native pollinators. She has been with the Xerces Society since 2014, first working in membership. Before Xerces, she worked for a variety of environmental groups on issues ranging from instream water rights to green building. Laura holds a bachelor's degree in environmental studies and has a certificate in nonprofit management from Southern Oregon University (the first Bee Campus affiliate!).
The Park Naturalist will give a fun and informative talk about how to identify he wild critters who left their mark in the park. Children who attend will receive a nature related do-at-home project kit.

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What does it take to make change in your community? No Mow May is a classic example of the hard work that it will take to engage with your local representatives to enact positive change in your community. Dr. Israel Del Toro and Ald. Alex Shultz will chat about their experiences over the last few years of enacting No Mow May in Appleton, WI. There is a need to be able to listen closely, empathize with your neighbors and at the same time balance the need for environmental stewardship.  This free Bee City USA webinar is hosted by Xerces Society and will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel on the Bee City USA playlist. Auto-generated Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Click here to register.   Alex Schultz Light haired person in dark clothes and facial hair looking directly at camera. Alex Schultz is the Executive Director of Sculpture Valley, a non-profit advocacy group for public arts established in 2011 to restore, protect and promote public arts in the Fox Valley. Since it’s inception, the group has worked with the city and community leaders to address the neglect of the city’s sculptural and memorial assets, successfully lobbying to establish a public fund in 2015 for future restoration and preservation efforts. Alex is the Alderperson for District 9 in Appleton and has served as the co-chair of the Pollenablers-Fox Cites group since its inception. He has worked alongside his counterparts on Council, now including Alderperson Del Toro and longstanding co-chair, Vered Melzer to propel environmental and social initiatives forward and was the co-author of the first No Mow May resolution in the United States. Israel Del Toro Israel Del Toro Ph.D. is an Associate Professor at Lawrence University in Appleton WI. His research focuses on the ecology and conservation of social insects.
North Carolina Webinar: Wednesday, June 7, 2023 Webinar Time: 1:30 pm-3:00 pm Eastern Time Where: Zoom (link to be sent out day before!) Who: ANYONE in North Carolina! Citizens, Extension Master Gardeners, schools, teachers, students, parents, homeschool groups, businesses, non-profits, government organizations, etc. Contact: Amanda Wilkins, amwilkin@ncsu.edu Date of the Census for 2023: Friday, August 18 and Saturday, August 19
Join the Great Southeastern Pollinator Census team to learn about the Census, how to participate in the Census, how to bring the Census to your community or organizations, and ask questions with the experts. If you want to help scientists understand what kind of insects are in your backyard, this is the project for you! The Census is a citizen science project in Georgia, South Carolina and North Carolina, created by the University of Georgia and was formerly known as the Great Georgia Pollinator Census.
 
Learn more about the Census here: https://ggapc.org/
This event will be recorded and posted to: The Xerces YouTube Channel
One of the best ways to help declining pollinators and other wildlife is to restore safe habitat for them. Although the concept of restoring habitat may not be complicated, there are plenty of barriers to successful, high-quality pollinator habitat restoration. One of the ways Xerces has tried to reduce these barriers is through our Habitat Kit program, which provides both plant materials and technical assistance to folks with the interest, experience, and land to make it happen. Through this program, we offer carefully selected, native and regionally appropriate plant material directly to our partners for shovel-ready projects. Please join us for this informative webinar to learn more about the program and how you can get involved. Click here to learn more and register today! This webinar will be recorded and available on the Xerces Youtube Channel. Closed Captioning will be available during the webinar. Jessa Kay Cruz  - Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist, California and the Intermountain West - The Xerces Society  Jessa is the Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist for The Xerces Society in California, and a partner biologist with the Natural Resources Conservation Service. She manages and coordinates many aspects of the pollinator program in California and throughout the western United States. Since joining Xerces in 2008, she has worked in agricultural and natural lands throughout the western U.S. to create habitat for pollinators and other beneficial insects, and to promote practices that support them. She provides education and technical support to a range of individuals and agencies, including farmers and ranchers, agricultural professionals, and land managers. Jessa holds a master's of science in environmental entomology and integrated pest management from California State University, Chico, and a bachelor's degree in sustainable farming from Hampshire College in Amherst, Massachusetts. Kaitlin Haase - Southwest Pollinator Conservation Specialist - The Xerces Society  As the Southwest Pollinator Conservation Specialist, Kaitlin works to create climate-resilient, connected pollinator habitat in Santa Fe and Albuquerque. She collaborates with and educates public and private urban land managers in New Mexico and the desert Southwest on pollinator-friendly practices for landscaping, gardening, and open space restoration. She holds a Master’s degree in Environmental Science and Policy from Northern Arizona University, where she studied impacts of drying on aquatic invertebrate diversity in natural and human-made ponds. Before graduate school, she worked as an ecological science technician in a variety of systems across the US, including predator-prey ecology in Michigan, riparian restoration in Virginia, and rare species monitoring in Massachusetts.
July 27
10:00 AM - 11:00 AM PT
Webinar
This event will be recorded and posted to: The Xerces YouTube Channel
  We are excited to invite Mikl Brawner, founder and co-owner of Harlequin’s Gardens in Boulder Colorado, to this webinar. Mikl will discuss Harlequin’s philosophy about plant health and their non-toxic pest management practices. Sharon Selvaggio, Pesticide Program Specialist at Xerces, will start off the webinar with an overview of why pollinator-safe nursery practices are important, and what plant buyers can do to identify and patronize pollinator-safe nurseries. Participants in this webinar will come away with an enhanced appreciation of the qualities to look for when sleuthing out pollinator-safe nurseries. Click here to learn more and register. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed captions will be available during this webinar. Sharron Selvaggio Pesticide Program Specialist, Parks, Nurseries & Natural Areas Lead - The Xerces Society  Sharon assists Xerces staff, partners, and the public to reduce reliance on pesticides and understand pesticide risk to invertebrates. Sharon previously worked at Northwest Center for Alternatives to Pesticides, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, and the U.S. Forest Service, and integrates her focus on pesticides with her experience managing natural areas and agricultural lands. Sharon earned a Master of Science in energy and resources and a Bachelor of Arts in biology, both from the University of California, Berkeley. Sharon spends a lot of time in her vegetable garden, which has an always-buzzing insectary/pollinator patch, and she is a frequent visitor to the Pacific northwest's wildlands for recreation. Mikl Brawner Founder and Co-owner - Harlequin's Gardens Mikl Brawner got his initial training along the creeks and woods of eastern Iowa. He studied biology at the University of Iowa, then went to India with the Peace Corps. Back in America, he managed a small organic apple orchard, and operated a tree care business. Studying plants, researching alternatives to pesticides, and developing a xeriscape garden led him from the treetops to a plant nursery. Now the evolving Harlequin’s Gardens is his lifework, helping the gardening community to bring nature into their personal lives and homes using sustainable plants, materials and methods. His current passion is soil health and energy-efficient greenhouses. He was honored with the 2009 PaceSetter Award for the Environment.
Stay tuned for an updated Bee City/Campus Promo Kit in our June eNewsletter!
Moths are important pollinators, too! Visit nationalmothweek.org to find events and activities near you.

This day-long forum will focus on the use of native plants in public-facing and large-format landscapes. Envision how public spaces can be redesigned to allow native species to thrive. Learn why this practice can increase biodiversity and reduce greenhouse gas emissions with smart operational cost considerations.

This forum is designed for owners and managers of public-facing and large-format landscapes and landscape professionals in the Triangle area. It is not geared for homeowners, but it is for mangers of homeowners associations and corporate landscapes, etc and the professionals who support or advocate for native plantings.

Format will include panelist presentations and discussions of local examples of these landscaping methods, practical lessons learned and recommendations for best practices. Landscape Architecture CEU credits will be offered – please inquire.

Check the Agenda & Speaker Page for additional information. We will offer tours to actual landscape examples on Thursday June 8! Visit the Tours Page to learn about and register for tour options.

JUNE 7 AGENDA

8:00 CHECK IN

9-9:30 INTRODUCTORY REMARKS

9:45-10:45 PANEL 1: “THE WHY” FOR NATIVE PLANTS IN PUBLIC PLACES

10:45-11 BREAK

11-12 PANEL 2: CASE STUDIES: LARGE SCALE SITES

12-1:30 LUNCH & ONSITE TOURS & NETWORKING

1:30-2:30 PANEL 3: CASE STUDIES: SMALL SCALE SITES

2:30-2:45 BREAK

2:45-3:15 FEATURE SPEAKER

3:15-3:45 FEATURE SPEAKER 2

3:45-4:00 CONCLUDING REMARKS & CLOSING CALL TO ACTION

4:00-4:30 ACTIVITY: EVALUATION, PLANNING, NEEDS

5:00 VACATE BUILDING

Register Here for Forum ($30)

  JUNE 8 TOUR SCHEDULE 9 am - Duke Gardens (small scale) 420 Anderson St, Durham, NC 27708 9 am - Chapel Hill Public Library (small scale) 100 Library Dr, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 11 am - Downtown Durham (small scale) 400 N Mangum St, Durham, NC 27701 11 am - Leaf & Limb Project Pando (large scale) 511 Nowell Rd, Raleigh, NC 27607 1pm - NC Museum of Art in Raleigh (large scale) 2110 Blue Ridge Rd, Raleigh, NC 27607 1 pm - Bluestem Conservation Cemetery (large scale) 1900 Hurdle Mills Rd, Cedar Grove, NC 27231 3 pm - Annie Louise Wilkerson Nature Preserve Park (large scale) 5229 Awls Haven Dr, Raleigh, NC 27614 Register Here for Tours (no cost)  
Join Kaitlin Haase, the Xerces Society's Southwest Pollinator Conservation Specialist, for a short presentation on Southwest pollinator conservation activities, followed by an extended Q&A and group discussion with Kaitlin and Bee City and Bee Campus USA National Coordinator Laura Rost. This is an opportunity to share your successes, ask for advice, and connect with your fellow affiliate cities and campuses. We're loosely defining the borders for our regional meetings, so feel free to join us if you are a Bee City or Bee Campus affiliate in Arizona, New Mexico, Nevada, Utah, Colorado, southern California, Texas, or Oklahoma. More regional meetings to come this summer! This free Bee City USA webinar is hosted by Xerces Society and will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel on the Bee City USA playlist. Auto-generated Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Register here.

Kaitlin Haase Southwest Pollinator Conservation Specialist The Xerces Society

Kaitlin Haase, Southwest Pollinator Conservation Specialist

As the Southwest Pollinator Conservation Specialist, Kaitlin works to create climate-resilient, connected pollinator habitat in Santa Fe and Albuquerque. She collaborates with and educates public and private urban land managers in New Mexico and the desert Southwest on pollinator-friendly practices for landscaping, gardening, and open space restoration. She holds a Master’s degree in Environmental Science and Policy from Northern Arizona University, where she studied impacts of drying on aquatic invertebrate diversity in natural and human-made ponds. Before graduate school, she worked as an ecological science technician in a variety of systems across the US, including predator-prey ecology in Michigan, riparian restoration in Virginia, and rare species monitoring in Massachusetts.

Join Xerces Society's Stefanie Steele, Pollinator Conservation Specialist for Urban and Small Farms in Underserved Communities and NRCS Partner Biologist, and Micah Kloppenburg, Wisconsin Pollinator Conservation Specialist for a short presentation on Great Lakes pollinator conservation activities, followed by an extended Q&A and group discussion with Stefanie, Micah, and Bee City and Bee Campus USA National Coordinator Laura Rost. This is an opportunity to share your successes, ask for advice, and connect with your fellow affiliate cities and campuses. Feel free to join us if you are a Bee City or Bee Campus affiliate in Illinois, Indiana, Michigan, Minnesota, New York, Ohio, Pennsylvania, or Wisconsin. More regional meetings to come! This free Bee City USA webinar is hosted by Xerces Society and will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel on the Bee City USA playlist. Auto-generated Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Register here Stefanie Steele Pollinator Conservation Specialist for Urban and Small Farms in Underserved Communities and NRCS Partner Biologist The Xerces Society

Stefanie Steele with the Xerces Society

Stefanie is the Pollinator Conservation Specialist for Urban and Small Farms in Underserved Communities and a NRCS Partner Biologist in the Upper Midwest – Detroit, Michigan area. Through this work, she provides technical assistance, planning, and education on incorporating pollinator and other beneficial invertebrate habitat in small urban agricultural areas and community gardens in historically excluded communities. Her work supports projects including the Xerces Habitat Kit Program, People’s Garden Initiative, and NRCS Conservation Programs through the USDA Farm Bill.

Stefanie received a master’s degree in biology from Portland State University where she studied the nesting habits of cavity nesting bees and wasps in the Portland, OR area and completed a multi-year study surveying the solitary bees in Portland’s urban core and their floral use. Since graduating, she has worked on numerous research projects studying diverse bee communities, and she has a deep knowledge of the taxonomy and ecology of native bees. While in Portland, OR, Stefanie worked with several urban gardens, orchards, farms, and restoration areas to help incorporate pollinator habitat in these spaces. Originally from Cincinnati, OH, Stefanie has a strong knowledge of the Upper Midwest local plant communities and is excited to be back working with urban communities in the Midwest.

Micah Kloppenburg Wisconsin Pollinator Conservation Specialist The Xerces Society Micah Kloppenburg with the Xerces Society As the Wisconsin Pollinator Conservation Specialist, Micah provides technical assistance to agricultural producers, land stewards, and community groups interested in creating and protecting pollinator habitat. Previously, Micah worked as an ecologist for a WI non-profit where he supported land owners in achieving their habitat protection and restoration goals; and, for a county parks department where he developed and led creative conservation activities and programming for youth and community groups. Micah holds a Master’s degree in restoration ecology from the University of Wisconsin-Madison, where he studied plant community change in remnant hillside prairies in the Driftless region. He enjoys canoeing, dabbling in jewelry metal art, and growing as many onions and garlic as he and his family can fit in their small garden.
Moths, flies, mosquitos… You will be surprised at how many different pollinators there are in Florida! In this class we will explore how plants have adapted to ensure their flowers are pollinated, why this is important, and the diversity of pollinators in our state. This webinar is recommended for adults and youth over 12. Register Here Pinellas County complies with the Americans with Disabilities Act. If you are a person with a disability who needs any accommodation in order to participate in this class you are entitled, at no cost to you, to the provision of certain assistance. Prior to ten (10) business days before the class, please submit your request to accommodations@pinellas.gov and weedonisland@pinellas.gov. In your request, please include the date and title of the program you need accommodations for, indicate that the Weedon Island Preserve Cultural and Natural History Center is the program host, and describe the specific accommodations you will need.
Save the date for this year’s Monarch Monitoring Blitz from 28 July to 6 August 2023! The International Monarch Monitoring Blitz invites community scientists from across North America to come together with the shared goal of helping to protect and conserve the beloved and emblematic monarch butterfly. Data collected by volunteers each year support trinational efforts to better understand the monarch butterfly’s breeding productivity, range, and timing in North America.

Consider promoting the effort within your networks. This is an opportunity to encourage, host or assist with monarch-related outreach events that involve submitting photo observations of monarchs (all life stages) and milkweed. There are promotional materials available in three languages - English, Spanish and French.

Promotional graphics and text (English, Spanish and French language versions) For additional information view the Commission for Environmental Cooperation (CEC) newsletter:
Pinellas County has recently been recognized as a Bee City (County) by the non-profit Xerces Society for the Conservation of Invertebrates. Part of our commitment to foster a community that supports insect conservation is to engage citizens in the collection of data on the health of our insect populations. You are invited to join others in the community for a fun, citizen-science effort to record as many species of plants and insects at Eagle Lake Park on September 2, 2023 from 7:00 a.m. – 3:00 p.m. This “Bio-Blitz” will give us an idea of the density and diversity of pollinators and the plants they depend on in one park in our county. Educators from the Brooker Creek and Weedon Island Environmental Education Centers will be on hand to get you started at the BioBlitz. You can sign-up here to keep updated by email of any useful information before the event. Otherwise, all are welcome to join us to start the Blitz at Shelter 3, Eagle Lake Park, 1800 Keene Road, Largo, FL 33771. For the rest of September, you can do your own bio-blitz in any Pinellas County Park by following some simple rules.
The Fall Wildflower and Pollinator Festival returns this year with a day of fun for the whole family! On Saturday October 7 from 9:00 to 4:00 you can celebrate Florida Wildflowers and the Pollinators that support us all. A native plant sale will feature vendors from our area with plants that are beautiful, pollinator-friendly and best suited for our climate. Kid’s crafts will focus on make-and-take projects to support pollinators in our own yards and neighborhoods. There will be a Pollinator Encounter tent to experience these helpful, harmless insects close-up, thanks to our friends at the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville. Various organizations will be available to answer questions about growing wildflowers, attracting pollinators, and being a good friend to Nature in Pinellas County! Refreshments, music and more await you at this free event. Pinellas County Wildflower and Pollinator Festival. Saturday, October 7, 2023. 9:00 – 4:00. Brooker Creek Preserve, 3940 Keystone Road, Tarpon Springs, FL 34688.
This event will be recorded and posted to: The Xerces Youtube Channel
Since first using a drip torch to start a prescribed burn back in 1991, Dr. Ray Moranz has been fascinated with prescribed fire and its effects on plants and wildlife. Ray will summarize some of the most important evidence of the negative effects of fire on pollinators, but follow that with examples of the benefits of fire. He will present examples from throughout the lower 48 U.S. states, with a slight bias toward his region, the Central Grasslands. He will recommend best management practices for fire and suggest sources of technical and financial assistance for prescribed burning. Click here to learn more and register today! This webinar will be recorded and available on the Xerces Youtube Channel. Closed Captions will be available during the webinar. Ray Moranz - Grazing Lands Pollinator Ecologist, Partner Biologist for the NRCS Central National Technology Support Center - The Xerces Society  Ray works to conserve pollinators on rangelands in the central U.S., and he also serves as a Partner Biologist to the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service’s (NRCS) Central National Technology Support Center in Fort Worth, TX. He is based at the NRCS Field Office in Stillwater, Oklahoma. One focus of his work is to assist in the planning and implementation of monarch butterfly conservation efforts in the south central U.S.. Ray began studying the effects of fire and grazing on prairie plant and butterfly communities in 2004, and earned his Ph.D. in natural resource ecology and management from Oklahoma State University in 2010. Prior to joining the Xerces Society, he worked for The Nature Conservancy in Florida, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in California, Iowa State University, and Oklahoma State University.
This event will be recorded and posted to: The Xerces Youtube Channel.
Join Emily May, Pollinator Conservation Specialist with the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, to talk about supporting pollinators and other wildlife in our yards and gardens through the changing seasons. Where do beneficial insects spend the winter? What does gardening for wildlife look like in the fall and winter? We'll talk about building resilience into our yards and gardens and rethinking our fall/winter garden aesthetic to better understand and support the lives around us. Click here to learn more and register today! This webinar will be recorded and available on the Xerces Youtube Channel. Closed captions will be available during the webinar. Emily May - Pollinator Conservation Specialist Agricultural Lead - The Xerces Society  Emily May is a Pollinator Conservation Specialist with the Xerces Society's Pesticide Program. She received a master's of science in entomology from Michigan State University, and has studied pollinator habitat restoration, bee nesting habits, and the effects of pest management practices on wild bee communities. Her work with Xerces since 2015 has focused on supporting crop pollinators through habitat creation and protecting bees and other beneficial insects from pesticides.
The Great Southeast Pollinator Census is back for another year, and now open to residents of Georgia, South Carolina, and North Carolina.
We’re mixing some of our favorite things together for an unforgettable weekend on the mountain - bluegrass music, brews, and bike races. Enjoy live music from Hackensaw Boys, Independent State, and Bourbon Revival; local craft beers; and a bike race on the blue trails of Western Territory. We're also throwing in a hint of pollinating to highlight our Bee City designation at Snowshoe. Beekeepers and honey vendors from near and far will be on the mountain to explain their professions and how important it is to keep our pollinators, well pollinating!
Feel free to share within your networks! This is free and open to the public! Sign up here

Join the Great Southeastern Pollinator Census team to learn about the Census, how to participate in the Census, how to bring the Census to your community or organizations, and ask questions with the experts. If you want to help scientists understand what kind of insects are in your backyard, this is the project for you!

When: Thursday, August 10, 2023 Time: 1-3 p.m. Where: Zoom (link to be sent out day before!) Who: ANYONE in North Carolina! Citizens, Extension Master Gardener Volunteers, schools, teachers, students, parents, homeschool groups, businesses, non-profits, government organizations, etc. Speakers include: Dr. Danesha Seth-Carley, Dr. Hannah Levenson, and Dr. Matt Bertone Topics include: Pollinator plants, current pollinator research projects and insect identification Contact: Amanda Wilkins, amwilkin@ncsu.edu Date of the Census for 2023: Friday, August 18 and Saturday, August 19 Learn more about the Census
Weedon Island Preserve is a home for many species of Pinellas County’s native bees. The native bees on Weedon Island are found in a variety of sizes from tiny ones that are the size of a grain of rice all the way to huge bumble bees and carpenter bees. Join a staff naturalist for a walk around the grounds to look for these fascinating insects that contribute to our ecosystem in many important ways. This walk is recommended for adults and youth ages 8 and up. All youth must be accompanied by an adult for the duration of the program. Spots are limited for this program so registration is required.
Join Kelly Gill, Xerces Society’s Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist, Northeast/Mid-Atlantic Region for a short presentation on Northeast and Mid-Atlantic region pollinator conservation activities, followed by an extended Q&A and group discussion with Kelly and Bee City and Bee Campus USA National Coordinator Laura Rost. This is an opportunity to share your successes, ask for advice, and connect with your fellow affiliate cities and campuses. Feel free to join us if you are a Bee City or Bee Campus affiliate in Connecticut, Maine, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, New York, Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, Vermont, Delaware, Maryland, or the District of Columbia. More regional meetings to come! This free Bee City USA webinar is hosted by Xerces Society and will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel on the Bee City USA playlist. Auto-generated Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Register Kelly Gill Senior Pollinator Conservation Specialist, Northeast/Mid-Atlantic Region As a Xerces Society Pollinator Conservation Specialist and a Partner Biologist with the USDA Natural Resources Conservation Service, Kelly provides technical assistance on pollinator conservation in the Mid-Atlantic and Northeast region. This work includes planning, designing, installing, and managing habitat for pollinators. Kelly also works with staff and research partners to develop technical guidelines and provide training on pollinator conservation practices. Kelly completed her master’s Degree in entomology at Iowa State University where she conducted research on the development of best practices for conserving native bees and beneficial insects in agricultural landscapes.   Header Photo Credit: Dickinson College Bee Campus USA Committee
From the Hendersonville area, the monarch migration is an epic journey to Mexico covering at least 2,000 miles. Like clockwork, the first migrating monarchs typically reach their over-wintering habitats high in the mountains of central Mexico by the first of November. To celebrate this amazing feat, more than 10,000 children from across the United States and Canada will participate in the 28th annual Symbolic Monarch Migration by creating paper butterflies to send to Mexico for the winter. Local classrooms, youth organizations, and individual students are invited to join them. These symbolic butterflies will correspond with the living monarchs’ actual journey south … and as the real-life monarchs arrive in Mexico for the winter, the symbolic butterflies will be delivered to schools in the area of the Monarch Butterfly Biosphere Reserve. Sometime in spring after the living monarchs’ departure from Mexico, groups of paper butterflies will also return north carrying special messages from the students in Mexico. United by the monarch butterfly, children across North America learn authentic lessons of conservation, cooperation, and ambassadorship. As funding allows, any group (up to 30 participants) of youth located within the City of Hendersonville and/or Henderson County may take part in the program at no cost. Individual students who are not part of a registered classroom or group may also participate at no charge by creating a paper butterfly and mailing or delivering it to Bullington Gardens by Friday, October 20, 2023 (95 Upper Red Oak Trail, Hendersonville 28792).  For more details visit  www.bullingtongardens.org/symbolic-monarch-migration.
This event will be recorded and posted to: The Xerces Youtube Channel
Dr. Ray Moranz will begin by presenting on the basic aspects of monarch biology, including the life cycle, the use for milkweeds as host plant, the incorporation of cardiac glycosides as a chemical defense, and the vulnerability of this species to various predators, parasites, parasitoids and diseases. However, the heart of the talk will be on monarch migration, and how monarch biology changes in fascinating ways from month to month as they move from one region of North America to another. He will do his best to provide information relevant to people from Saskatchewan to Mexico City, and from Nova Scotia to Cuba, and everywhere in between. He will conclude by talking about some things you can do to help monarchs where you live. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Learn more and register here today! Ray Moranz - Grazing Lands Pollinator Ecologist, Partner Biologist for the NRCS Central National Technology Support Center - Xerces Society  Ray works to conserve pollinators on rangelands in the central U.S., and he also serves as a Partner Biologist to the USDA’s Natural Resources Conservation Service’s (NRCS) Central National Technology Support Center in Fort Worth, TX. He is based at the NRCS Field Office in Stillwater, Oklahoma. One focus of his work is to assist in the planning and implementation of monarch butterfly conservation efforts in the south central U.S.. Ray began studying the effects of fire and grazing on prairie plant and butterfly communities in 2004, and earned his Ph.D. in natural resource ecology and management from Oklahoma State University in 2010. Prior to joining the Xerces Society, he worked for The Nature Conservancy in Florida, the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service in California, Iowa State University, and Oklahoma State University.
This event will be recorded and posted to: The Xerces Youtube Channel
When you think of bees, you probably imagine the things they do on sunny days, like flying around and pollinating flowers. But this is only half of the story, as most of the 20,000 species of bees found around the world nest belowground, and spend the majority of their lives in darkness. What are they doing underground? How do they navigate their burrows and communicate with other bees? What happens when it rains? There are many interesting questions surrounding this lifestyle, and also plenty of uncertainties remaining to be resolved about subterranean living. In this webinar, we will learn about the diversity of ways that bees live and reproduce belowground, and we'll ponder some of those unsolved mysteries. We'll also talk about how the belowground lifestyle affects threats to bees, such as exposure to pesticides and pathogens. This webinar will cover some bees you may be familiar with, such as bumble bees, but we'll be focusing our time on soil-nesters who we generally know less about, including the many solitary bees that do not live in colonies. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Learn more and register here today! Leif Richardson - Conservation Biologist & California Bumble Bee Atlas - Xerces Society Leif is a conservation biologist who coordinates the California Bumble Bee Atlas project. His research focuses on the ecology, distribution, and declines of North American bumble bees. Leif previously worked as an environmental consultant, studying pesticide risk to bee pollinators, and as an ecologist for Vermont Fish and Wildlife Department. He is co-author of a range of scientific publications on bees, including Bumble Bees of North America: An Identification Guide (2014, Princeton University Press), the standard reference manual on this group of insects. He is an expert in the inventory and identification of bumble bees, and has extensive experience training others to collect bumble bee distribution data in the field. Leif holds a Master’s degree from the University of Arizona and a PhD from Dartmouth College.
This event will be recorded and posted to: The Xerces YouTube Channel
Join Isis Howard, Endangered Species Conservation Biologist with the Xerces Society for Invertebrate Conservation, to talk about the powerful ways community science is shaping the conservation of western monarch butterflies. From surveying monarchs and their milkweed host plants in the summer to counting butterflies clustering along the west coast in the winter, learn how everyday individuals are collecting important data to protect an iconic species. This webinar will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel. Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Learn more and register here today! Isis Howard - Endangered Species Conservation Biologist, Western Monarch Community Science - Xerces Society As an endangered species conservation biologist, Isis works in California to protect and support the western population of monarch butterflies. She manages several community science projects, including the annual Western Monarch Thanksgiving Count and the Western Monarch Milkweed Mapper, and provides support to land managers and the public on maintaining and restoring western monarch breeding habitat. Prior to joining Xerces, Isis worked for a resource conservation district and the North Coast Soil Hub, advancing climate adaptation work in the agricultural sector, engaging diverse community partners, and expanding the RCDs' western monarch and pollinator program. Originally from Sonoma County, CA, Isis is an experienced outdoor educator and holds a bachelor's degree in environmental management and protection with a minor in biology from Cal Poly, San Luis Obispo. In her free time, Isis enjoys listening to podcasts, trying new creative outlets, and advocating for diversity and inclusion in the outdoors.
Join Laurie Hamon, Xerces Society’s Endangered Species Conservation Biologist for a short presentation on the Southeastern Bee Atlas, followed by an extended Q&A and group discussion with Laurie and Bee City and Bee Campus USA National Coordinator Laura Rost. This is an opportunity to share your successes, ask for advice, and connect with your fellow affiliate cities and campuses. Feel free to join us if you are a Bee City or Bee Campus affiliate in Alabama, Arkansas, Florida, Georgia, Kentucky, Louisiana, Mississippi, North Carolina, Puerto Rico, South Carolina, Tennessee, Virginia, and West Virginia. More regional meetings to come! This free Bee City USA webinar is hosted by Xerces Society and will be recorded and available on our YouTube channel on the Bee City USA playlist. Auto-generated Closed Captioning will be available during this webinar. Register A person in green and tan stands in a bog gesturing towards green pitcher plants.Laurie Hamon Endangered Species Conservation Biologist The Xerces Society Laurie is the project manager for the Southeast Bumble Bee Atlas, a community science project to track and conserve bumble bees in North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, and Tennessee. She earned her PhD at North Carolina State University, where she conducted her thesis on the pollination ecology of Venus flytraps. She has conducted survey work for multiple rare insect species and investigated insect communities in urban pollinator gardens. Laurie has previous experience coordinating a community science project to monitor butterflies at a biological reserve in Chapel Hill, North Carolina. When the work day ends, Laurie enjoys making art and spending time outdoors. Header Photo Credit: Bee Campus East Carolina University, NC